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Newnan reviews voting districts, not adopted yet


  • By Joe Adgie
  • |
  • Nov. 30, 2022 - 7:38 PM

Newnan reviews voting districts, not adopted yet

City of Newnan

These proposed voting districts have been raised by the city of Newnan to maintain “proportionate population balance” in each of the three districts, as City Manager Cleatus Phillips put it.

The Newnan City Council reviewed proposed modified voting districts for their city for 2023 and beyond at their meeting on Tuesday.

“This is a process that we go through after the release of the census data every 10 years,” said Newnan City Manager Cleatus Phillips. “The reason we go through the process to review our council districts is that we have compliance with the Voting Rights Act. The main thing we … look at when we look at our current voting districts is are we still ‘one person, one vote’? Do we still have proportionate population balance in each of the three districts?”

Phillips said that as of now, the answer to that question is no.

“District 1 had a little bit of growth, district 2 had the majority of the growth, and district 3 actually lost a little bit of population, so hence we had to go through the process to rebalance the one-person, one-vote criteria,” Phillips said.

The proposed changes would put 14,392 residents in District 1, 14,669 residents in District 2 and 13,488 residents in District 3.

District 1, on the eastern side of the city, is currently served by Paul Guillaume and Dustin Koritko. Prior to redistricting, it represented 34.68 percent of the population. It is 65.89 percent white, 15.25 percent Black, 9.32 percent Hispanic and 7.2 percent Asian.

After redistricting, it would represent 33.82 percent of the city, and would be 66.05 percent white, 14.96 percent Black, 9.32 percent Hispanic and 7.27 percent Asian.

The district would expand westward slightly, with its western boundary moving from Newnan Crossing Boulevard, south of Lower Fayetteville Road, to Interstate 85. North of Lower Fayetteville Road, Newnan Crossing Boulevard remains the western boundary of the district.

District 2, in the center of the city, is currently served by Rhodes Shell and Ray DuBose. Prior to redistricting, it represented 40.53 percent of the population. It is 53.35 percent white, 28.18 percent Black, 12.04 percent Hispanic and 4.32 percent Asian.

After redistricting, it would represent 34.48 percent of the city, and would be 55.19 percent white, 27.05 percent Black, 12.51 percent Hispanic and 3.31 percent Asian.

The district would gain land south of First Street, down to a new southern border at Lagrange Street, Nimmons Street and Turner Street.

District 3, in the southwestern part of the city, is represented by George Alexander and Cynthia Jenkins. Prior to redistricting, it represented 24.79 percent of the city. It is 57.97 percent Black, 29.26 percent white, 10.14 percent Hispanic and 0.86 percent Asian.

This district, Phillips said, is a “majority-minority” district, and he said the city was looking at ways to maintain the strength of that particular district.

After redistricting, the district would represent 31.70 percent of the city, and would be 52.68 percent Black, 32.67 percent white, 9.96 percent Hispanic and 2.71 percent Asian.

The district would be extended eastward to portions of Lower Fayetteville Road, with boundaries on the east being Newnan Crossing Bypass and Ashley Park Boulevard.

During the meeting, members of the public had the opportunity to speak on the changed districts, but no one did so.

There was no action taken by the Newnan City Council at their meeting Tuesday. No date has been officially announced for adopting the districts.