The Newnan Times-Herald

Subscribe Now

Subscribe Now

Arts & Community

The Boys: Season 3 - Rude series continues its zany and violent trajectory


  • By The Newnan Times-Herald
  • |
  • Jun. 02, 2022 - 9:58 AM

The Boys: Season 3 - Rude series continues its zany and violent trajectory

“The Boys” is an irreverent, adult-skewing series that, in this installment, continues to impress, setting up an inevitable season four.

Man-and-Camera-FIX-8-10-copy-2.png?mtime=20191120165310#asset:43993

Review By: Jonathan W. Hickman

Series Details:

Creator: Eric Kripke (see “Supernatural”)

Cast: Karl Urban, Jack Quaid, Antony Starr, Erin Moriarty, Dominique McElligott, Jessie T. Usher, Laz Alonso, Chace Crawford, Tomer Capone, and Karen Fukuhara

The first three episodes of season 3 are now streaming on Amazon Prime, with new episodes streaming each week

“The Boys” rolled out on Amazon Prime in 2019, and its second season became a pandemic guilty pleasure. The series is an adaptation of the Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson comic book of the same name that debuted in 2006 and ended in 2012.

I’ve got a soft spot for this often profane and ferocious take on the superhero genre. Think of “The Boys” as a bizarro, R-rated MCU. Amazon shared the entire third season with critics, and, naturally, I binged every episode.

In the series, a hero group called the Seven is led by a warped superman-clone named Homelander (Starr). The Seven does some good while also mercilessly hurting innocents. The collateral damage gives voice to the opposition, chiefly manifested in mercenary Billy Butcher (Urban), who has a personal vendetta against Homelander. The story brings us fully into the tilted and dangerous world of the supers and those humans that must contend with outrageous abusive behavior.

Season three picks up where the last one left us in the ruins (both physical and emotional) following the brutal battle with lunatic neo-Nazi supervillain Stormfront (Aya Cash). The mentally disturbed Homelander is still in control of the Seven. Still, he’s been reigned in a bit by a nefarious, controlling corporation, Vought International, headed by the manipulative Stan Edgar (“Breaking Bad’s” Giancarlo Esposito). Meanwhile, Butcher’s partner Hughie (Jack Quaid) works a new government job while also dating the squeaky-clean hero Starlight (Erin Moriarty).

As Butcher continues his aggressive campaign to kill Homelander, he investigates the possible existence of a Cold War weapon that reportedly killed that generation’s Homelander, an egotistical Captain America-like hero named Soldier Boy (Jensen Ackles).

Meanwhile, politician Victoria Neuman (Claudia Doumit) continues her disturbing rise with some help from dark forces. And the mute super-powered Kimiko (Fukuhara) and the mercenary chemist Frenchie (Capone) remain involved in an odd, somewhat platonic relationship. This season balances the large cast of characters well while introducing new supers along the way.

Each of the over-the-top, blood-soaked episodes is undeniable fun. The casting offers up some entertaining choices, such as “The Boondock Saints” star Sean Patrick Flanery as an aging super known as Gunpowder. And “The Walking Dead” actress Laurie Holden is entertaining as a saucy middle-aged former hero called the Crimson Countess.

In one revealing episode, an eclectic assembly of lower-end heroes lets their hair down at a raucous party, with one of the supers letting his freak flag fly. The wild, unpredictable nature of such sequences keeps “The Boys” consistently watchable.

The political machinations are intricate and fascinating, matched by the explosive and ultra-violent action. What works best is the underlying theme that explores the co-existence of humans and those with extraordinary powers. It’s also a sometimes-goofy take on fame, as the superheroes closely monitor their social media accounts, which may be their biggest foes.

“The Boys” is an irreverent, adult-skewing series that, in this installment, continues to impress, setting up an inevitable season four.