The Newnan Times-Herald

Local

Council approves 40-lot development, denies 95-unit village


  • By Clay Neely
  • |
  • Apr. 25, 2019 - 8:30 AM

Council approves 40-lot development, denies 95-unit village

City of Newnan

One of two rezoning requests were approved by the Newnan City Council on Tuesday night.

One of two rezoning requests were approved by the Newnan City Council on Tuesday night.

The council unanimously granted an RS-15 (suburban residential single family) zoning for a proposed 40-lot subdivision on a 30-acre parcel located at 950 North Hwy. 29.

The proposed subdivision would have minimum lot sizes of 15,000 square feet and homes with a minimum of 2,000 square feet with a price point beginning at $350,000, according to Dennis Drewyer who was acting on behalf of property owners, Cathryn and William Sullivan.

Formerly known as the “Pike” home, the land currently is zoned rural conservation.

The city said the project is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan’s need to address the lack of available land within the city limits and provides a larger lot option with the RS-15 zoning that rarely is sought for annexations and rezonings.

While denser than the current zoning allowed in the county, the existing vegetation and ponds would be preserved to help maintain the scenic and rural feel of the Highway 29 North corridor, according to Newnan City Planner, Dean Smith.

Drewyer said the homes will be constructed using a combination of masonry and hardie board with architectural shingles.

Both of the subdivision’s entrances will be located on Old Atlanta Highway, so there will be no access off Highway 29 except for emergency purposes.combinepdf.jpg?mtime=20190422140929#asset:38246


Nearby resident, Mac Tracey, spoke in opposition of the development, stating that a similar RS15 rezoning nearby was recently rejected by the county and city.

Tracey said there should be no more than 19 homes on 31 acres, which would be consistent with the Lake Ridge, Lake Hills and Newnan Pines neighborhoods.

“If you approve this project, please hold off on other requests for similar homes on Hwy. 29 until we see how this plays out,” Tracey said. “See how this takes shape, sells and affects the community before auditing to the congestion on the corridor."

The council approved the Hwy. 29 rezoning unanimously, but had reservations about the other rezoning request.

Drewyer also appeared on behalf of Ascension QOF Partners, LLP, who sought the rezoning of more than 24 acres located on McIntosh Parkway from Urban Residential Single-Family Dwelling District (RU-7) to Mixed-Use Development District (MXD) for creating a 95-unit village, which would include a mixture of residential and office space.

Included with the 95 units would be a clubhouse, pool, fitness center and a proposed greenspace covering 22 percent of the property. The residential rental condos and roads would be owned and maintained by a single entity.

The housing units would range between 1,800- and 2,000-square-feet with monthly rent more than $1,500.

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Included with the 95 units would be a clubhouse, pool, fitness center and a proposed greenspace covering 22 percent of the property. The residential rental condos and roads would be owned and maintained by a single entity. 

Following a previous discussion about the lack of affordable housing in the city, Mayor Pro Tem Cynthia Jenkins asked Drewyer about the decision to make the properties rental.

“We’re looking to increase home ownership,” Jenkins said. “Why not offer the ability to purchase?”

Drewyer said the decision was “driven by the market, and by request” and that the homes would be available for sale within 10 to 15 years.

“The density you have is still over the top,” said Mayor Keith Brady, referencing the reduction of units from the initial plan from 125 units to 95, and also took issue with long-term promises of developers.

“During our last economic downturn, we saw plans from developers in our city and across nation thwarted… we still have roads that developers left unpaved and unfinished,” Brady said.

“The mixed use component concerns me,” Brady said, referencing the proposed office space in the front.  “When you’re coming out of Ashley Park, going down the parkway into downtown – that’s all residential.”

Drewyer said the developer believed the mixed use would be something good for city.

“Not commercial, but office use,” Drewyer said. “We thought it would be a good mix to the table.”

The project was unanimously denied by the city council.